The UC Berkeley Hillel Chocolate Haggadah

Here’s another chocolate seder haggadah we found online.  No glitz, no glamor.  Just provided for you as a reference for another set of chocolaty traditions.

Click here to download this chocolate haggadah.

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A Dessert Charoset Recipe

Ya, it’s a chocolate seder… But on another level, it’s a dessert seder, and while most of what we talk about has chocolate in it, you might hit a level of chocolate overload at a certain point and be ready for something not-so-chocolaty.

Enter the dessert charoset — a delicious and sweet blend of nontraditional charoset ingredients that will impress your guests and add a twist to your standard or chocolate seder!

We found this dessert charoset recipe here.

Dessert Charoset Recipe

2 chopped apples
6 mashed bananas
1 juiced and grated lemon
1 juiced and grated orange
1-1/4 cup chopped dates
4 teaspoons chopped candied orange peel
Nuts
1 cup red wine
Matzah meal
2 teaspoons cinnamon
Sugar

Blend the fruits and nuts. Add wine. Add as much matzah meal as the mixture will take and still remain soft. Add cinnamon and sugar to taste. Mix well and chill before serving.

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Chocolate Plagues and seder plate… Mmmm…

We’re creative.  We like to think outside the box and figure out fun ways to build a unique chocolate seder experience.  We don’t want to take the easy way out… But that doesn’t mean you don’t want to.

So, for those of you who want something cool for your chocolate seder, and don’t mind taking the easy way out, check out the complete chocolate seder plate and chocolate plagues set.  It’s pareve, and although it doesn’t say it anywhere, it appears to be kosher for passover.  It includes a chocolate mold of the seder plate, all the items on the seder plate, and chocolate molds of all the plagues.

Be advised though — we found ourselves rolling our eyes many, many times as we read the description on the product page.  Whoever wrote it is, what we’d describe as “the lame kind of creative”.

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The chocolate karpas and dom that’ll melt in your mouth, not in your hand

You can find a candy for everything.  But if you just can’t figure out what to use for that special purpose, there are always M&Ms.

We found a container of red and green M&Ms (ya, they were probably assembled for a different holiday), that’s perfect for several chocolate seder moments.

  • green M&Ms — use them as karpas (the green vegetable that you’ll bless near the beginning of the seder).  You can also use them to represent tzfardea (frogs) if you choose to have items for each of the biblical ten plagues.
  • red M&Ms — they’re the blood (dom) of the first plague (imagine turning a glass of water into a glass of those!), or place them all over your face to be boils – another of the plagues.

Of course, these arent kosher for passover, but they’re a must (in any color) for your chocolate seder!

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Kosher for Passover Chocolate Chip Cookie Recipe

What chocolate seder would be complete without some sort of chocolate chip cookie?  Some chocolate seder enthusiasts have even been known to use chocolate chip cookies as the matzos!  Whatever you use them for, you’ll want to give these a try this Pesach.

We all have our favorite year-round chocolate chip cookie recipes, but not necessarily one for Passover.  So, here you go.

BTW, we can’t take credit for it — we found it here.

Kosher for Passover Cinnamon Chocolate Chip Cookie Recipe

These Passover Cinnamon Chocolate Chip Cookies are made with an adaptation of my Aunt Clara’s fantastic Pesach Chocolate Chip Cookie recipe. The only change is the addition of cinnamon — the recipe is just too good to tinker with otherwise! If you like a crunchy cookie with an almost shortbread-like texture, this is a good recipe for your year-round repertoire.

Makes about 3 dozen cookies.

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 10 minutes

Total Time: 30 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup oil
  • 1 cup Passover cake meal
  • 2 tablespoons potato starch
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 cup ground hazelnuts or walnuts
  • 1 3- to 4-ounce bittersweet or semisweet chocolate bar, chopped, or a scant 1/2 cup chocolate chips

Preparation:

In a large bowl, beat together the eggs and the sugar, until the mixture is thick and light yellow. Whisk in the oil.

Add the cake meal, potato starch and cinnamon, and mix until well-combined.

Stir in the nuts, then the chocolate, mixing until both are evenly distributed. Cover the bowl and chill for at least an hour, or overnight. (Dough may also be made ahead and frozen, then defrosted in the refrigerator until it is soft enough to shape.)

Preheat the oven to 400° F. Line two cookie sheets with parchment paper.

Using clean hands, make walnut-sized balls of the chilled dough, and place about 1 1/2 inches apart on the cookie sheets. Flatten the balls with your palm or a spatula.

Bake in the preheated oven for 10 minutes, or until the cookies begin to turn a light golden brown. Transfer to racks to cook. Enjoy!

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matzo ice cream?

We’re not sure exactly how this works into the seder.  Do you dip in it? Can it count as the afikoman?  Melt it and drink it as a cup of “wine”?

We’ll think about it and get back to you.

Nevertheless, we’ve found another awesome and unique matzo item for your chocolate seder — Matzo Ice Cream and Macaroon Ice Cream!  From the looks of it, it isn’t Kosher for Passover.  What a shame!  But it looks delicious, and is well worth the novelty to have it at your chocolate seder (or real seder, if you aren’t concerned with the dairy after meat and non-Kosher for Passover issues).

Buy Chozen’s Passover-themed ice creams here, and let us know how they are!

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Chocolate Yemenite Charoset

Charoset is naturally sweet and delicious. Few will argue with that. Yemenite Charoset one-ups the apples and walnuts that many ashkenazic Jews know as “the only” way to have charoset, and starts with an exponentially-sweeter date and fig mixure, and incorporates numerous other delicious and some-times exotic ingredients.

For our chocolate seder, we’ve found a recipe that takes things to a level we never thought possible! Check out this recipe for chocolate Yemenite charoset developed by Judy Zeidler (we found it here). By the way, it can also be adapted to make awesome truffles!


Yemenite Charoset/Charoset Truffles

1 cup pitted, chopped dates

1/2 cup chopped dried figs

1 teaspoon ground ginger

Pinch of coriander

1 small red chili pepper, seeded and minced,

or pinch of cayenne

2 tablespoons matzah meal

1/3 cup sweet Passover wine

3 tablespoons sesame seeds

2 cups melted semisweet chocolate

In the bowl of a food processor fitted with the knife blade, blend the dates, figs, ginger, coriander, chili pepper, matzah meal and wine. Mix in sesame seeds and transfer to a glass bowl. Roll into one-inch balls or serve in a bowl.

Makes about 1 1/2 cups or 12 balls.

Dessert Variation: Dip charoset balls into melted chocolate and place on wax paper-lined baking sheet and refrigerate.

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You Don’t Have to Drink your Chocolate “wine”


There are four glasses… there’s no reason why all four need to be poured in a glass.

We found a very interesting alternative while searching for chocolate wine on google.  Check out the chocolate covered wine gels in the link to the right.  I haven’t tried them, and I don’t know if they’re any good, but odds are they’ll stand out as the most unique “glasses” of wine at any seder.

They aren’t Kosher for Passover, so keep that in mind if you’re planning your chocolate seder during Pesach.  But on the plus side, they’re alcohol free! So, everyone at the table can enjoy together!

If you’ve tried them, let us know how they are!

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The Kesher Chocolate Seder Haggadah

There are several chocolate Passover seder haggadahs out there.  The one we like the most, and have used in the past, is the Kesher chocolate seder haggadah.  It’s fun, easy and complete with both Hebrew and English.

We’ve found it in multiple places online, but just to be sure that the links don’t disappear on us, we’ve saved it to our server for you to download straight from this site.

Keep in mind, we didn’t create this Haggadah.  If you like it, or want  more info about it, there are some credits on the last page.

Click here to download the Kesher Chocolate Seder Haggadah.

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An amazing chocolate matzo recipe

You’ll need three matzos for your chocolate seder.  Make them count!  Use one recipe for all of them, or get creative and make three different kinds!  You can even use the recipe below, and add different toppings to really impress your guests.

Here’s an amazing recipe for a chocolate candy matzo that we found here.  You’ll want to make this year round, and definitely serve it as dessert at your traditional seder.


Chocolate Caramel Matzo Crunch aka Matzo Crack

amazing chocolate matzo

Makes about 30 pieces of candy

4 to 5 pieces of matzo*
1 cup firmly packed dark brown sugar
1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter
1 cup chopped bittersweet chocolate, or semi-sweet chocolate chips
Toppings, as desired

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit, and line a baking sheet with aluminum foil and/or parchment paper.

Place the matzo in one layer on the baking sheet, breaking it when necessary to fill the pan completely. Set aside.

In a large sauce pan, melt the butter and brown sugar over medium heat, stirring constantly. Once the mixture reaches a boil, continue to cook for an additional three minutes, still stirring, until thickened and just starting to pull away from the sides of the pan. Remove from heat and pour over the matzo, spreading an even layer with a heat-proof spatula.

Put the pan in the oven, then immediately turn the heat down to 350 degrees. Bake for 15 minutes, watching to make sure it doesn’t burn. If it looks like it is starting to burn, turn heat down to 325. (While it is cooking, resist all urges to scrape the pan with extra pieces of matzo. You will burn yourself. Trust us.)

After 15 minutes, the toffee should have bubbled up and turned a rich golden brown. Remove from the oven and immediately sprinkle the chocolate over the pan. Let sit for five minutes, then spread the now-melted chocolate evenly with a spatula.

You can leave it just as is, enjoying the simplicity. Or add your favorite toppings while the chocolate is still melted.

Let cool completely, then break into smaller pieces and store in an airtight container (or leave the matzos whole if you’re using them as part of your chocolate seder!). Rumor has it that this will last a week stored properly, but well, we’ve never had it last long enough to test out the theory.

*When it’s not Passover, you can use unsalted saltine crackers instead of matzo, but we prefer the flavor and texture of matzo.

During Passover, avoid toppings of peanuts, as many Ashkenazi Jews abstain from legumes during Passover. You can substitute margarine for the butter to make it parve or vegan. Be aware that some Jews won’t eat foods made in a non-kashered kitchen, or those made with non Kosher-for-Passover ingredients.

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Posted in: chocolate ideas | chocolate matzo recipes | kosher for passover | recipes | Comments (0)

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